The American missionary Lorenzo Warriner Pease describes a wedding ceremony that took place in the bride’s house, as was the custom, especially if the family was prominent:

This morning early, we went to attend a wedding, to which we had been invited by the groomsman, Delevando.The manner of the invitation is not very formal. When the head of the family is invited, the whole family is considered as included. Indeed often the women go without an invitation, and are not considered as intruders. We waited some time for assembly. On entering the house, we were presented with smoking incense which we smelt of, and then wet our hands with rose water, [and had a wax candle presented to us, which is not burnt.] On sitting we had cakes and coffee. We sat and talked some time, when we were invited to enter another room filled with ladies, where they began to prepare the wreaths, which are made of olive twigs, covered with paper then with red ribbon and finally with gold tinsel. During the whole time, several priests engage in a service over the work. By the time these were finished the bride was brought in by several females, and sat with her hands in her lap and her eyes upon her hands, as coy as could be. The priests then went out, and directly a cry was heard when the bridegroom came in and the bride rose to receive him, with her eyes still down cast. They then stood by the side of each other, supported by two groom’s men and maids. The service commenced by an old priest taking two rings, and placing them together on the forehead of the man, while he said, I betroth A. to B. (removing the ring’s to the woman’s forehead) in the name etc. making the sign of the cross on the man. This was repeated three times. He then reversed the order, betrothing the woman in the same manner. After a short service, he united them in marriage in the same manner and then put the rings on the little finger of the right hand of each party, which were changed by one of the groom’s men. At the same time they were crowned by a similar ceremony exchanging the crown’s etc. The groom’s men and bride’s maids then supported the crowns during the remainder of the ceremony. The priest then gave them each a piece of bread dipped in wine, [which was a part of the ceremony, not the communion]. To close they were led around a table in the room three times, the priests continuing the service, when some friends threw cotton seeds, wheat and paras towards the roof, which fell upon the happy couple and the by-standers. Afterwards, the near friends kissed the crowns of each, while the married couple kissed their hands, we all then saluted them, took our coffee, were sprinkled with rose water, took our candles and left. It is the custom for the near friends to send in presents. The salutation continue during the week…